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Summer is HEATING Up!

by Allison Simson

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Happy Tuesday to YOU!

After a pretty gloomy May, we are ready for the mountain sunshine!  You've heard it before, but it's TRUE!  People come to Summit County in the winter to visit, and they come back in summer to stay!  Summer here is just, well, heaven!!  

The market overall in Summit is HOT- warm in some segments and sizzling in others. Values are hyper-local- as usual! 

For some of the nitty-gritty details in our different communities, check out the links below.  If you are wondering about values in a particular neighborhood or complex, reply to this email and we can get you the details - STAT!!  

1) Breckenridge
 
 
2) Dillon
 
 
3) Frisco
 
 
4) Keystone
 
 
5) Summit County Update
 
 
6) Wildernest/Silverthorne
 

See you on the trails!

And check out this new listing....the perfect mountain getaway:

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161 North Side CIR

Price: $475,000

Beds: 3

Baths: 2

½ Baths: 1

Sq Ft: 1624

Wait till you see the inside of this one! Tastefully updated & furnished DP w/ new hardwood floors, carpet, freshly painted deck. Take in the Keystone & Divide views while sitting in your private hot tub. Sunny & large master suite, that's very priv...

View this property >>

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If you were in the mountains, you know that the weather was glorious and that lots of people were here!  The kick-off to summer is here and we are busy! 

Are you curious how the market is doing in Summit County, or specifically in any of our charming towns?  Here is the run-down:

1) Breckenridge
2) Dillon
3) Frisco
4) Keystone
5) Summit_County_Update
6) Wildernest / Silverthorne
 

For more specific information about any particular complex or subdivision, give us a holler!  We can give you all the details to help you make informed decisions about Summit County real estate! 

Is now a good time to purchase a second home?

by Allison Simson

Question:  We are considering purchasing a second home in Summit County, CO…we are nervous about the economy, of course, but it has been a dream of ours for a very long time.  Is now a good time?

Answer: Good question!  Yes, there is cause to be nervous about the market and the global economy, AND the things that you love about Summit County and the benefits that owning here will bring to your family are priceless.  Sometimes it helps to take a look at what the rest of the country is doing…. according to Keeping Current Matters and a report from the National Association of Realtors, vacation homes sales were on the  rise in 2012!

“The American desire to own a second home as a vacation home is alive and well!

The National Association of Realtors analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data shows there are 7.9 million vacation homes in the U.S. Their 2013 Investment and Vacation Home Buyers Survey shows vacation home sales improved in 2012.

NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun said favorable conditions are driving second-home sales:

“We had a strong stock market recovery, which helps more people in the prime ages for buying vacation homes. Attractively priced recreational property is also a big draw.”

Here are the key findings from the report:

Raw Numbers

  • Vacation-Home sales rose 10.1 percent to 553,000 from 502,000 in 2011
  • Sales accounted for 11% of all transactions last year, unchanged from 2011
  • 35% of vacation homes purchased in 2012 were distressed homes

Buyer Profile

  • The typical vacation-home buyer was 47 years old
  • The median household income was $92,100
  • Buyers plan to own their recreational property for a median of 10 years
  • 29% said they were likely to purchase another vacation home within two years
  • 78% of all second-home buyers said it was a good time to buy (compared with 68% of primary residence buyers)

Reasons for Purchasing

Lifestyle factors remain the primary motivation for vacation-home buyers:

  • 80% want to use the property for vacations or as a family retreat
  • 27% plan to use it as a primary residence in the future
  • 23% plan to rent to others
  • 23% wanted to diversify their investments or saw a good investment opportunity

Location

  • 45% of vacation homes purchased last year were in the South
  • 25% in the West
  • 17% in the Northeast
  • 12% in the Midwest

The vacation home buyer purchased a property that was a median distance of 435 miles from their primary residence

  • 34% were within 100 miles
  • 46% were more than 500 miles

Financing

  • 46% of vacation-home buyers paid cash in 2012

The median down payment was 27%, the same as in 2011

So, while you can never be 100% certain about the real estate market, signs are pointing toward increased consumer confidence in the market. 

For answers to your real estate questions, call Allison at 970-468-6800. Email - [email protected]. Her philosophy is simple, whether buying or selling, she understands that the most important real estate transaction is yours.  Want to know the value of your Summit County property? Visit www.SummitHomeValue.com   

Housing Price Predictions

by Allison Simson

The ski areas are winding down for the season - the sun is shining and we are enjoying a lovely spring here in Summit County.  The snow is still great, so I hope you get a chance to hit the slopes another time or two!

Interesting news:  Predictions around the country for housing prices are looking up, up, up!  What does this mean for Summit County, CO?  Historically, our market tends to lag behind the national economy by about 12-18 months. We are starting to see our prices stabilize in many segments of our market and we are beginning to see multiple offer situations on the "cream puffs" * that come on the market.

* A cream puff is the property everyone is looking for- priced right and in super condition!  They are not lasting in our market!

Consider the following from the Keeping Matters Current Crew:

Two Additional Experts Upgrade their Pricing Forecast

 Last Monday, we reported that several analysts had upgraded their projections for home price appreciation in 2013. A few days later, the Wall Street Journal revealed that two additional analysts had also upgraded their forecasts.
Zelman & Associates
“Ivy Zelman, chief executive of research firm Zelman & Associates, said Wednesday she was now expecting prices to rise by 7% this year, up from earlier estimates of 6%, 5%, and 3%…She’s also calling for a 5% gain next year because she says the supply shortages and growing demand that fueled last year’s turnaround show no signs of easing.“
Her reasons:
“The shortage of housing capacity continues to resonate. Just as deflation was a national headwind that stretched deeper into the economy than anyone would have imagined, we believe that appreciation can carry broad, positive implications for the consumer and economy beyond many expectations.”
John Burns Real Estate Consultants
“John Burns, who runs a real-estate consulting firm in Irvine, Calif., is calling for a 9% gain in home prices this year, up from a 5% forecast late last year.”
 His reasons:
“Strong investor demand and low interest rates that have boosted the purchasing power of buyers.”
These two experts join a long list of housing analysts who have now called for a major rebound in housing prices in 2013.

Enjoy the spring! 

What’s Up with Housing Inventory?

by Allison Simson

Question:  What’s Up with Housing Inventory?

I am excited to have Chip Wagner, an icon in the appraisal industry and friend of “Keeping Matters Current” as a guest writer today.  Although Chip’s observations are primarily about Chicago- it’s a great “primer” to remind us of how the housing sector works and it is relevant to the majority of the country.  I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again – remember that the Summit County Real Estate market tends to lag behind Denver and the national economy by about 18-24 months, historically. Enjoy this information from Chip!

It’s All About Supply and Demand

Definitions of Supply and Demand:

 Dictionary.com

In classical economic theory, the relation between these two factors determines the price of a commodity. This relationship is thought to be the driving force in a free market. As demand for an item increases, prices rise. When manufacturers respond to the price increase by producing a larger supply of that item, this increases competition and drives the price down.

In real estate appraisal context, the principle of Supply and Demand states that:

The price of real property varies directly, but not necessarily proportionately, with demand and inversely, but not necessarily proportionately, with supply.

My most simple explanation of Supply and Demand is: It is the relationship between sellers present in a market, which is the supply; and buyers looking, which is the demand. This relationship is reported in months’ supply of inventory.

So, what is the latest challenge?

Some (or most) might say that there are not enough “good” homes for sale. This could represent a shortage of supply, something we have not talked about for several years. It is allowing sellers to raise their asking prices and buyers who have been ‘shopping around’ are now willing to pay higher prices based on other homes they are comparing and/or contemplating to the home that they want.

Why aren’t there many “good” homes for sale?

There are several contributing factors:

1. New construction – We are seeing new construction picking up again at all price points, which is certainly a positive. But with fewer builders, and more conservative approaches after getting burned, builders are not keeping up with the demand that is present. This is leaving buyers searching for resales. And because of the slowdown in new construction, (few new homes were built between 2007 and 2012) the nearly-new resales rarely exist.

Lack of new construction is a contributing factor as many builders folded or downsized significantly over the past 5-6 years.

2. Foreclosures – Foreclosures are a trend that is affecting supply of inventory. Banks are slower at foreclosing, in some cases taking over 3 years through the process. In some cases, the buyers aren’t even interested in these properties, and the investors are picking up these properties and flipping them at a profit.

Foreclosure properties, once viewed as a deal perhaps 25% to 40% under market values, are now being sold at only a 7% discount according to RealtyTimes.com.

3. Investors – Investors have entered the market at greater levels, some to purchase properties to rent, others to rehab and flip them. With the high inventory, investors were able to seek out the best deals, now there are fewer homes available for them.

4. Few people really want to sell at the bottom – Personally, I think the biggest reason that our inventory is low is simply because everyone wants to buy at the bottom; but what seller really wants to sell their home at the bottom of the market? That being said, there are many sellers who cannot sell.

Recently, I heard Steve Harney speak at the Leading Real Estate Companies of the World Conference; he stated there are over 10 million people that are still under water and cannot sell their homes. That is a significant number – these are ‘move-up buyers’ that will create a domino effect. A portion may also represent the potential downsizing buyers who have that upper priced home to sell. This is a very complicated situation. There are many opportunities in the market as demand continues to surge.

Move-up sellers have pent up demand and are ready to buy – if they can sell!

Remember, our market dropped 37.6% as a region since 2007 (some areas fell less than 20%, and other areas fell greater than 50%). The buyers with 20% down lost equity in their homes. Buyers with 5% or 10% lost substantial equity in their homes. If they sell today, they don’t have the down payment necessary for that next home.

Various predictions by “experts” suggest our recovery may be anywhere between 2% and 8% annually. At a conservative 4% annual rate of recovery, it is 5 more years before we can reach 20%.  Those who last purchased their home between 2006 and 2008 are being hurt the hardest in today’s market.

One positive is that renters are ready to purchase. Generation X and Y buyers now believe in homeownership; they want to get out of renting apartments because rents continue to go higher than taking out a mortgage. Interest rates remain at historic lows, with no indication of a significant increase of rates on the horizon.

Back to Supply and Demand …

A balanced supply of inventory is considered to be 4 to 6 months. A balanced supply is going to be neutral in pricing, while an undersupply is going to lead to upward pressure on prices – a Seller’s Market. An oversupply will lead to downward pressure on prices – a Buyer’s Market.

Our supply of inventory is at its lowest level since the end of 2006 and most areas have been reduced to a balanced supply of inventory, with undersupply observed in many sub-markets in the region.

The anticipation is that the pricing will continue to be pressured upward as the desirable properties (in terms of location and condition/modernization) will be gobbled up. Remember the multiple-contracts driving up values last decade? Many agents are now experiencing these trends again.

Get ready for a wild and crazy ride as our real estate market is pulled and pushed in all directions in 2013

Here are a few things to watch…

  • Watch the days on market (DOM). Take time to understand if an area’s high DOM may be due to stale listings of homes that are overpriced, distressed and/or in inferior condition.
  • Trend the increasing Sales Price-to-List Price ratios - in many sub-markets that I appraise in, I have seen these trend from 93% to 96% or higher just in the past year.
  • Track the number of pendings in relationship to the number of listings? One appraiser friend of mine tracks this and calls this “market velocity.” Right now, I see some areas where there have more pendings than listings in a given sub-market.
  • Are the pendings priced higher than the previous sales prices? Another indication of an increasing market that I am seeing in many areas.

Welcome to, we all hope, the Slow and Steady Housing Market Recovery!

 

For answers to your real estate questions, call Allison at 970-468-6800. Email - [email protected]. Her philosophy is simple, whether buying or selling, she understands that the most important real estate transaction is yours.  Want to know the value of your Summit County property? Visit www.SummitHomeValue.com  

Summit County Quarterly Sales Report for your area is available!

by Allison Simson

How is the Summit County, Colorado Real Estate market???  Good question!

At Summit Real Estate, it is always our pleasure to keep you informed about what’s happening with regard to the market here in our fine county!  We enjoy providing the HARD FACTS about the market – not just the cocktail conversation and innuendo!

Ready for some great information about each and every complex in Dillon, Frisco, Keystone and Wildernest/Silverthorne regarding recent sales and active listings? You can view it online right now! Click the hyperlink below, fill out the information required and you will automatically be directed to the sales reports for Summit County.  Good stuff.

Summit Real Estate Quarterly Report

We value your opinions and comments.  Let us know what you think!

10 'must-do' steps to sell your home this year

by Allison Simson

Question:  Allison, I keep hearing about how the market nationwide- and in Denver is heating up, but our home in Summit County has been on the market for several months now and hasn’t had any offers.  We didn’t do much to fix it up, because we thought it didn’t matter.  Are there some things we should do now to help the place sell?

Answer: Yes, it’s true that our market is stabilizing and moving in some “segments”…not every category of home is feeling the incline yet.  I always believe that it’s important to put your home’s best foot forward before selling.  Even if you own something that will sell in a snap no matter what its condition, you can help it sell more quickly and with fewer hassles with a bit of attention to detail.  According to David Sambrotto there are 10 must-do steps to selling in any market.

1. Recognize every market is different. Your state, town or neighborhood could dovetail with national numbers or buck the trend entirely. "There really is no national market," says Sambrotto. "There's a patchwork of regional markets." Never rely solely on one person's advice or opinon. Talk to a handful of professionals, do your own research and listen to your gut instinct.

2. Get your home inspected. "Before I would even call a real estate agent, I'd have my home inspected," says attorney Diana Brodman Summers, author of "How to Buy Your First Home." Some real estate agents advise against spending the money (most basic inspections range from $200 and $400, according to a 2004 survey from the American Society of Home Inspectors), because the buyers will get one anyway prior to closing. Others recommend it, because it gives sellers an early warning on any repairs they might have to make. But in this market, it's better to be proactive, says Summers. "I would rather know what the inspector is going to find and be able to fix it -- and pick who will fix it," she says. Her method also allows you to shop around for the best price instead of perhaps paying an inflated price later on.

3. Shape up before marketing. A buyer's market means you've got more competition. "You want to put your best foot forward," says Eric Tyson, co-author of "House Selling for Dummies." If your home isn't appealing and in good repair, potential buyers won't even stop. Some sellers feel it's OK to skip this step and take less, but if the house is not appealing you may not get the chance to negotiate. "Six weeks before you want to put it on the market is a great time to get it done," says Summers. You don't need to renovate, but make sure everything looks great and works well. There are some things you can do to make your home stand out:

  • New paint. Paint the whole house, if it needs it, or just the trim, shutters and door to freshen up.
  • A clean entry way. Sweep or pressure-wash the front walk and porch. Polish the outdoor metalwork, clean the windows and glass and replace any burnt-out bulbs in outdoor lighting. And, if you can, add planters with flowers.
  • Lush landscaping. Think new mulch, sharp edging, a healthy lawn and beds of flowers.
  • "Maximize your chances of people being excited about your listing when it hits the market," says Tyson. 

4. Devise a marketing plan. Do you want to use a real estate agent or would you rather sell it yourself? If you try doing it yourself, have you set a time limit after which you want to enlist the aid of a professional? Selling it yourself can save you the real estate commission (often about 6 percent), which can be an advantage in a tight market. But a buyer's market (or rapidly changing market) is also a good time to have a little professional expertise to price, market and move your property. And don't forget, potential buyers may feel that if there's no agent involved the price should already be 6 percent less. Both the buyer and the seller can't save the same 6 percent.

5. Check into company relocation assistance. Are you moving to take a new job or position? If so, the company might offer some resources to make things easier, says Summers. Some companies will even provide a list of real estate pros who will work with you at a discount. If you're selling in a tight market, every little bit helps. Best source: call your human resources department.

6. Interview real estate agents. If you're interested in using an agent, interview several early on about listing your home, says Tyson. "Ask them for their advice," he says. "That's a good way to select an agent." What would they highlight about your home? What would they change before it goes on the market? Ask to see an activity list -- a list of all the buyers and sellers they've represented, the areas of town and the price ranges. You don't want private details, says Tyson. But you want to see if they've worked in your neighborhood, in your price range and if they have a track record of successful sales.

How old are the comparable sales (often called "comps") they are showing you? A few years ago, you could study comps that were 6 months or a year old. This year, because many markets are changing, you want neighborhood comps that are no more than two to three months old, says Summers.

And find out how long each has been a professional. Experience counts. "If you're going to pay 6 percent, you might as well get the best your money can get," says Tyson.

7. Set a price. The rules are different in soft vs hot markets. "You don't overprice your house 20 percent to leave wiggle room for negotiating," says Tyson. While that kind of strategy might never be a good idea, it can really backfire in some markets. If your property is overpriced 20 percent, the buyer's agent "may not even show it to them," he says. Again, it's not a matter of being willing to negotiate. If your price is too high potential, buyers may not even look at it. And they may very well see a negative message in such a high price. "Those who overprice their homes in this market are wasting everyone's time," he says.

Then set a realistic figure. Your goal: to maximize the chances that the perfect buyer will actually see it, Tyson says.

To get an idea of what's going on now, you want recent comps. But you may also want to look at comparables from the last six months. "You will see trends," says Patricia Fitzgerald, broker/owner of Coastal Properties in Jupiter, Fla. "You also need to look at what is in the market" in that area, she says. Are properties moving? Are prices holding steady or are sellers dropping prices?

Pricing is strategy. And much of it comes down to just how motivated you are to sell -- or how quickly you have to leave.

If you have to pad the price, it's "an art, not an exact science," Tyson says. "Five to 10 percent is one thing. Fifteen to 20 percent and you have a problem."

Two more points to consider:

  • Modern technology. Agents and buyers are often using computers to search for properties. If you want to sell yours for around $400,000, consider listing it at $399,999, rather than $400,500. That way, a computer search of anything between $350,000 and $400,000 will include your listing.
  • Commissions aren't add-ons. Don't add the real estate commission to the value of the home to come up with your asking price, says Tyson. If you use an agent, the fee comes out of your share of the profits. Otherwise, "you're going to get penalized for overpricing your house," he says

8. Understand your price. While you don't want to undervalue your house, many sellers today won't make as much as neighbors who sold last year, says Summers. If you have your heart set on a certain amount, and find out that houses aren't selling for that, you may "have to change your mind and sit on the house," she says.

9. Get rid of the junk. "This year it's more important because buyers are going to be more fussy," says Summers. "Buyers are going to come in with an attitude." Throw things out, ship them early or rent a storage locker. But clear out that clutter. Buyers look for space and light. To show it off, you need to be able to tour a group comfortably through the house, as well as actually walk into those "walk-in" closets.

10. Stay on top of the market. "You must be aware of market changes," says Summers, which is one reason she recommends using an agent. Stay on top of what is happening with mortgages and finance rates, keep looking at comps and, "see trends before they happen," she says. "The real estate market is still in a time of correction. You have to be so careful with both buying and selling."

 

For answers to your real estate questions, call Allison at 970-468-6800 or 1-800-262-8442. Email - [email protected] or visit their web site at www.SummitRealEstate.com. Allison is a long time local in Summit County. Summit Real Estate – The Simson/Nenninger Team is located at the Dillon Ridge Marketplace. Allison’s long-time residency and years of real estate experience can help you make the most of any buying or selling situation. She’s a Certified Residential Specialist (CRS), the highest designation awarded to a Realtor in the residential sales field.  Her philosophy is simple, whether buying or selling, she understands that the most important real estate transaction is yours. 

Colorado resorts' housing market rebounds

by Allison Simson
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

By Jason Blevins
The Denver Post

Posted:   02/17/2013 12:01:00 AM MST

A huge December pushed 2012 high-country real-estate sales to their highest levels since 2008.

Three years after the resort real-estate market cratered in 2009, sales in six Colorado resort counties have rebounded.

Realtors say the rebound was supercharged in the last few months of the year, with December sales ranking as one of the strongest since the boom times of 2007.

In Pitkin County, where average prices in tony Aspen were $4.2 million in 2012 and most high-end deals are done in cash, December sales reached $270 million, up 116 percent over December 2011.

Aspen broker Tim Estin said uncertainty over tax changes planned for 2013, primarily estate and capital-gains taxes, "likely fueled a number of these transactions before the end of the year and trumped the uncertainty caused by the 'fiscal cliff' debate."

In Eagle County, where December sales climbed 90 percent, buyers whittled away at a dwindling supply of properties.

"It was a combination of people searching for a good investment and watching a market near the bottom," said Vail broker Gil Fancher, who posted his best month ever in December with a mix of high-end, midmarket and fractional sales. "People are realizing I can park money in this area and come and use it or I can rent it and I can even gain a little back on my investment when the market returns."

That return has been slow, especially to the levels seen in 2007. Back then, real-estate sales in Eagle, Grand, Pitkin, Routt, San Miguel and Summit counties topped a record $10 billion. Two years later, the economy reeled, resort-area foreclosures reached rec-ord levels and prices plummeted. Total sales in those counties in 2009 barely hit $3.6 billion. Last year, sales in the six counties reached $4.9 billion, still less than half of 2007 but 22 percent ahead of 2011 and 37 percent ahead of the 2009 low point.

"The new normal is realistic expectations. Slow and steady," said Mike Periolet, a 20-year broker and 10-year town councilman in Winter Park, anchor of the Grand County market that saw a 26 percent annual increase in dollar volume in 2012.

Periolet said he thinks the market eventually will return to the volume seen in 2007, when Grand County posted a record $640 million in sales. But it will take time and development of new homes to replace the Fraser Valley's ample supply of 30-year-old condos.

"There are always buyers for new product, so as the demand creeps back in, the developers will follow," Periolet said. "We'll start building again, and it will all cycle. Until the next crash. And I'll be retired by then."

Steamboat Springs' Routt County has seen a slower rebound than other resort areas, climbing 7 percent in 2012.

The county's real-estate market fell hard from 2007 to 2009, losing more than $1 billion in sales volume.

Routt's climb back has been slow, with prices remaining low. And as in other resort communities, December was exceptionally busy in Routt County, with $73 million in sales, a 56 percent increase over the previous December. Still, average prices in Routt did not climb in 2012.

"We have some tremendous values, and right now, it's the time to buy," said Stan Urban of Land Title Guarantee Co.

Telluride also saw a momentous December, with $76 million in sales, the highest since July 2007. San Miguel County enjoyed a 47 percent surge in sales volume over 2011, the largest increase of all six resort counties and its best year since 2007. (Still, 2012 sales in San Miguel County were less than half of 2007.)

Investor mentality is shifting from a concentration on financial returns toward lifestyle returns, said longtime Telluride broker T.D. Smith.

Many see the Telluride and Mountain Village market as "bottomed out," Smith said.

"There is definitely a recognition by people that they can buy in this market and they are not going to get hurt," he said. "People are tired of being tired. They are ready to move on and teach their children and grandchildren how to ski and fly-fish and be a part of the mountain environment."

Jason Blevins: 303-954-1374, [email protected] or twitter.com/jasontblevins

 

Should you sell now?

by Allison Simson

In Summit County, historically, our busiest sales season is June - October.  Many homeowners in Summit County are waiting until the Summer ‘buying season’ to list their homes for sale. Here are five reasons why that might not make sense this year:

1.) Demand Is High
Home sales are higher than last year. The most recent Existing Home Sales Report by the National Association of Realtors (NAR) showed that annual sales in 2012 increased 9.2% over 2011 nationally.  Here, the increase in number of sales from 2011- 2012 was 18%. There are buyers out there right now and they are serious about purchasing.

2.) Supply Is Low
The monthly supply of properties for sale is at its lowest point (10 months) since 2006. The current month’s supply is down 21.6% from the same time last year. Historically, inventory increases dramatically in the spring. Selling now when demand is high and supply is low may garner you your best price.

3.) New Construction Is Coming Back
Over the last several years, most homeowners selling their home did not have to compete with a new construction project around the block. As the market is recovering, more and more builders are jumping back in. These ‘shiny’ new homes will again become competition as they are an attractive alternative to many purchasers.

4.) Interest Rates Are Projected to Inch Up
The Mortgage Bankers’ Association has projected mortgage interest rates will inch up approximately one full point in 2013. Whether you are moving up or moving down, your housing expense will be more a year from now if a mortgage is necessary to purchase your next home.

5.) Timelines Will Be Shorter
The dramatic increase in transactions caused many challenges to the process of buying or selling a home in 2012. We waited for inspections, dealt with last minute appraisals and prayed that the bank didn’t ask for ‘just one more piece of paper’ before issuing a commitment on the mortgage. There are fewer transactions this time of year. That means that timetables on each component of the home buying process will be friendlier for those involved in transactions over the next 90 days.

If you have thought about selling your property, consider these five good reasons why you should consider listing your house today instead of waiting.  If you would like a personalized valuation of your Summit County property, please respond to this email!  We are delighted to help! 
 

 

 

For answers to your real estate questions, call Allison at 970-468-6800. Email - [email protected]. Allison is a long time local in Summit County. Summit Real Estate – The Simson/Nenninger Team is located at the Dillon Ridge Marketplace. Allison’s long-time residency and years of real estate experience can help you make the most of any buying or selling situation. She’s a Certified Residential Specialist (CRS), the highest designation awarded to a Realtor in the residential sales field.  Her philosophy is simple, whether buying or selling, she understands that the most important real estate transaction is yours.  Want to know the value of your Summit County property? Visit www.SummitHomeValue.com  

 

Summit County News & Views is here!

by Allison Simson

Hello from Summit County!  We are in full gear for 2013 It’s starting out to be a great year!

Here is our latest (and greatest!) News & Views magazine.  It’s loaded with good info for you – Market updates, sales pricing history, articles on the various towns in Summit County, what your money can buy in Summit County, great properties – and best of all – the Summit Calendar of events! 

Please click on the picture below to enjoy our Winter edition of Summit Real Estate News & Views....

See something that catches your eye, please give us a call.  We'll be happy to send you more detailed information about ANY property for sale in Summit County.

We value your opinions and comments-if there is something you would like to see in our magazine next time, just ask!   Let us know what you think!  Have a safe and happy winter!

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Summit Real Estate
The Bright Choice
330 Dillon Ridge Way, Suite 10
Dillon CO 80435
970-468-6800
800-262-8442
Fax: 970-468-2195

Allison Simson, Owner/Broker, is a licensed Colorado Real Estate Broker